Sarah Dababnah

Sarah DababnahSarah Dababnah, Assistant Professor

Contact Information:
Phone: (410) 706.8076
E-mail:sdababnah@ssw.umaryland.edu
Room: 5E39

CV

Mailing Information:
UM
School of Social Work
525 West Redwood Street
Baltimore, MD 21201

Sarah Dababnah, PhD, MPH, MSW is an Assistant Professor at University of Maryland Baltimore School of Social Work. She specializes in practice, policy and research related to the health and well-being of families of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Currently, Dr. Dababnah is leading several intervention research projects, domestically and internationally, focused on caregivers of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. She is dedicated to promoting high-quality research and practice for especially vulnerable populations of children with developmental disabilities, including those exposed to intimate partner violence or involved in the child welfare system. Dr. Dababnah received specialized training in early childhood and disability practice, research, and policy at the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities (Chapel Hill, NC), the Kennedy Krieger Institute (Baltimore, MD), the Columbia University National Center for Children in Poverty (New York, NY), and the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health (Washington, DC). She is also a former Peace Corps Volunteer, and holds advanced degrees from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Johns Hopkins University.

Education

MPH, Johns Hopkins University
MSW: PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Expertise and Research Interests

Services and Support for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Child and Adolescent Mental Health
Sceening of Autism Spectrum Disorders
Early Intervention Services for Young Children with or at risk for Developmental Disabilities

Health-related Issues of Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and their Caregivers
Evidence-based Practices
Disability and Mental Health Policy
Cross-cultural Comparisons
Global Disability Issues
Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods

Recent Publications

Ghosh, S., Dababnah, S., Parish, S. L., & Igdalsky, L. (in press). Disability, social exclusion and poverty. In E.G. Iriarte, R. McConkey & R. Gilligan (Eds.). Disability and Human Rights: Global Perspectives. New York: Palgrave MacMillan.
 
Dababnah, S. & *Bulson, K. (2015). "On the sidelines:” Access to autism-related services in the West Bank. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 45(8). doi: 10.1007/s10803-015-2538-y
 
Rizo, C. F., Macy, R. J., Ermentrout, D. M., O’Brien, J. E., Pollock, M. D., & Dababnah, S. (2015). Research with children exposed to partner violence: Perspectives of service-mandated, CPS- and court-involved survivors on research with their children. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1177/0886260515596534
 
Dababnah, S. & Parish, S. L. (2015). A comprehensive literature review of randomized controlled trials for parents of young children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/23761407.2015.1052909
 
O’Brien, J. E., Ermentrout, D. M., Rizo, C. F., Li, W., Macy, R. J., & Dababnah, S. (2015). “I never knew which way he would swing…:" Exploring the roles of substances in the lives of system-involved intimate partner violence survivors. Journal of Family Violence. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/s10896-015-9747-1
 
Dababnah, S. & Parish, S. L. (2015). Feasibility of an empirically-based program for parents of preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Autism: International Journal of Research and Practice. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1177/1362361314568900
 
Dababnah, S. & Parish, S. L. (2014). Incredible Years program tailored to parents of preschoolers with autism: Pilot results. Research on Social Work Practice. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1177/1049731514558004
 
Dababnah, S. & Parish, S. L. (2013). “At a moment, you could collapse”: Raising children with autism in the West Bank. Children and Youth Services Review, 35(10), 1670-1678. doi:10.1016/j.childyouth.2013.07.007
 
Castro, S., Ferreira, T., Dababnah, S., Pinto, A. I. (2013). Linking autism measures with the ICF-CY: Functionality beyond the borders of diagnosis and interrater agreement issues. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 1-11. doi:10.3109/17518423.2012.733438
 
Swaine, J. G., Dababnah, S., Parish, S. L., & Luken, K. (2013). Family caregivers' perspectives on barriers and facilitators of cervical and breast cancer screening for women with intellectual disabilities. Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 51(1), 62-73. doi:10.1352/1934-9556-51.01.062
 
Parish, S. L., Rose, R. A., Swaine, J. G., Dababnah, S., & Marya, E. T. (2012). Financial well-being of single, working-age mothers of children with developmental disabilities. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 117(5), 400-412. doi:10.1352/1944-7558-117.5.400
 
Parish, S. L., Swaine, J. G., Luken, K., Rose, R. A., & Dababnah, S. (2012). Cervical and breast cancer screening knowledge of women with developmental disabilities. Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 50(2), 79-91. doi: 10.1352/1934-9556-50.2.79
 
Parish, S. L., Rose, R. A., Dababnah, S., Yoo, J., & Cassiman, S. A. (2012). State-level income inequality and health care burden of US families raising children with special health care needs. Social Science & Medicine, 74(3), 399-407. doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.10.035
 
Dababnah, S., Parish, S. L., Turner Brown, L., & Hooper, S. (2011). Early screening for autism spectrum disorders: Implications for social work practice and policy. Children and Youth Services Review, 33(2), 265–273. doi:10.1016/j.childyouth.2010.09.009
 
*Denotes student mentee